Preserved In Glass: The Art and History of Wet Specimens

Wet Preservation, Human child's arm with Embryo, by Bernardus Siegfried Albinus, Circa 1730, Musee Boerhaave, Netherlands.
Wet Preservation, Human child’s arm with Embryo, by Bernardus Siegfried Albinus, Circa 1730, Musee Boerhaave, Netherlands.

Illustrated lecture with Mark Batelli, Wet Specimen Preparator and Restorer at Obscura Antiques
Date: Tuesday, March 25
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $8
Presented by Morbid Anatomy

“Wet specimens” preserve an organic object–be it a human body part, zoological specimen or plant–in fluids such as alcohol or formalin and airtight case, generally for use by student of science and medicine. Such pieces can last indefinitely; many specimens–some stretching back to the hundreds of years–still exist today, looking much as they did when originally preserved. Earliest wet specimens–such as those by Bernahard Albinus and Frederik Ruysch–were often also highly inventive and artistic, and valued as collectables by private collectors, aspiring cabinetists and museums alike.

In tonight’s heavily illustrated lecture, wet specimen preparator and restorer at Obscura Antiques Mark Batelli will outline the art and history of these fascinating objects, focusing on their inception, development, refinement, obsolescence, and present day relevance.

Brooklyn based artist Mark Batelli works as a wet specimen preparator and restorer at Obscura Antiques, with a history as a traveling DJ and artist, digerati and a nomadic Boheme through the western world from California to Greece.

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