Category Archives: Fashion

Patches now available via Cvltnation Bizarre

Cat Skull Screen Print Patch by Mark Splatter, now available on CvltNationBizarre.comI have recently expanded my online vending presence to the music webzine http://www.cvltnation.com’s designer marketplace, Cvltnation Bizarre. You can buy a limited selection of my work there as well. It’s proved to be a good move so far, and during the month of May I have reduced prices on patches to $2 (available through Etsy for the regular price of $3. The audience at CvltNation is certainly more directly in touch with the aesthetic I have been cultivating in the images I print. Natural History, Morbid Anatomy and Deathpunk Streetwear. So visit their site and have a look at some of the other vendors they host, many of which make and sell a lot of enviable wares.

http://www.cvltnationbizarre.com/

Trepanation Gear T-Shirt

Trepanation Gear T-shirt by Marksplatter Printwerks, Silkscreen Print, Discharge InkThis is a diagram of the equipment used in the 18th and 19th century trepanation process, including several gauges of bores and a usage illustration. This is a public domain image taken from the book From Skulls to Brains: 2500 Years of Neurosurgical Progress, published in 2008 by The American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Print area is approximately 16″x12″.

Buy On Etsy

Printed on black ‘Canvas’ brand cotton jersey t-shirt for excellent fit and quality. The color is an eggshell white, printed with discharge ink, a special ink that permeates the fiber of the t-shirt. Unlike most inks such as plastisol or water base that simply rest on top of the fiber and are prone to flaking off or leaving heavy deposits, discharge effects and bonds with the very material of the garment. Also available in:

• white plastisol on black shirt
• black waterbase in on grey shirt
• red plastisol on black shirt

Pier Paolo Pasolini – No More Heroes

Pier Paolo Pasolini, RIP November 2, 1975, No More Heroes Tshirts from Mark SplatterPier Paolo Pasolini †2 November 1975

No More Heroes is a line of shirts providing memorial for a series of artists, inspirational and motivational to our studio; likenesses of icons and iconoclasts who have been my heroes and mentors – part reverence, part remembrance. Moved by the death of Dennis Hopper in 2010 the series began.

This is Pier Paolo Pasolini. Italian writer and poet, he moved into the film business where he reached the world with his graphic, explicit imagery and biting commentary on the status quo.

Currently no longer in stock on Etsy but available via special order/print on demand.

ANATOMICAL ARMOR, CENTURION

Anatomical Armour Tshirt from Mark Splatter Printwerk, Mike Sappol, Dream Anatomy, anatomist Juan Valverde de Amusco, engravings by Gaspar Becerra, gut viscera, Roman Centurion armor, anatomical atlas "Anatomia del corpo humano" Rome, 1559

This is a diagram of the human anatomy of the abdomen. After Andreas Vesalius’ comprehensive guide to anatomy in the 16th century revolutionized medicine and surgery, more detail emphasized on anatomical diagrams. From Mike Sappol’s ‘Dream Anatomy’: the anatomist Juan Valverde de Amusco (1525–ca. 1588) published these engravings by Gaspar Becerra (1520?–1568?). The artist drafted the gut viscera onto this illustration of Roman Centurion armor in his anatomical atlas “Anatomia del corpo humano” Rome, 1559. Copperplate engraving. National Library of Medicine.

Printed on black ‘Canvas’ brand cotton jersey tshirt for excellent fit and quality. The color is a burnt brown printed with discharge ink, a special ink that permeates the fiber of the tshirt. Unlike most inks that simply rest on top of the fibre and see prone to flaking off or leaving heavy deposits like plastisol or water base, discharge effects and bonds with the very material of the garment.

Available on Etsy: $28USD +shipping (worldwide)

Vending Appearances September 2015

Mark Splatter at Morbid Anatomy Flea Market, The Bell House, August 30, 2015, photo credit Village Voice, NYCFirst of all a thanks to everyone who visited the Morbid Anatomy Flea Market at The Bell House on August 30 which was a resounding success with a lot MORE vendors, more fun, more people and more great and curious STUFF! Looking forward to the next one on October 18th. Silkscreen Patches, Tshirts, Totebags and Wet Specimen Preparations all did very well, but on the other hand, some of my more natural object assemblages got very little attention. I’ll have to give them more play and display next time.

Next up in September is NYC’s NecroComiCon, September 20 at The Delancey. This is a nighttime event in the gothic scene with Live Bands, Costume Contest, DJs, vendors and hosted by NYC’s own Master of Ceremony, Voltaire. Other Vendors will include Wren Briton of PureVile and Dellamorte & Co.

NecroComiCon 2, September 20, 2015 at The Delancey

Then in October on the 5th and 6th, I’ll be in Philadelphia for Death Salon at their Dark Artisans Bazaar, held at the world renowned Mütter Museum for a two day intensive program of lectures presented by today’s leading minds on death and its anthropological, historical, and artistic contributions to culture.

California Deathrock – The Photo Book

 Mark Splatter circa 2003 at a Release the Bats photo session with Amelia G and Forrest Black 
2000-2005 was a particularly relevant time in deathrock culture. I had just moved to California from New Jersey, as the proprietor of Deathrock.com, a webzine that served as a sort of beacon for the dark-minded music aficionado. Part reference guide, part webzine, it was a place where bands like UK Decay, TSOL, and The Mob first got more than just a mention in a collectors’ trade list. I was a young zine publisher who’d taken up web design in its infancy and was eager to share my love for anything remotely Misfits-esque, or even darker, more somber sounds like Southern Death Cult and Kommumity FK.

The New York presence of adherents for such sounds was lacking, apart from a small corps of gloom rockers like Charlie the Slut and Paul Morden, who took me under their wing as an aspiring DJ, and our close friends. When I visited California to meet some of the Los Angeles correspondents I was blown away by the packed floor of a club dedicated to just such sounds at Release The Bats. NYC always stood apart as too homogenous and sophisticated in its tastes to cater to such a niche and outmoded (although beloved) style. It was a no-brainer that the West Coast was where I wanted to be, where deathrock, as many argue, was born. 

Six months later I packed my bags and arrived, a 21-year-old devil lock-wearing deathpunk, and a postage stamp-sized record distributer with a case of music and a pair of DJ headphones. There it was not that it was still going strong, as it was ground zero for a full-on rebirth. New bands were evolving and converging, local bands coming into their own distinct style, Cinema Strange and The Deep Eynde pumped all sorts of energy and fishnet into our veins, and local legends were showing their faces again. Kommumity FK, Dinah Cancer and Gitane Demone resumed their positions as luminaries. Release the Bats was our Mecca, facing west. Bands from all over the globe were sending their energy into it too. Crews from further north and south were getting in touch. First the San Francisco synth-damaged Phantom Limbs with The Vanishing one on top of the other. Frank The Baptist and Diana Death from San Diego.

In that motley crew of deathrockers, gothpunks, dark new wavers, postpunks and horrorpunks were Amelia and Forrest, of Blueblood fame—one of the only established alt-porn names of the day. With their camera savvy and eye for the exotic black-clad, they managed to capture in brilliant gloss the blackest the Sunshine State had to offer, from Los Angeles to San Francisco. Now their work has been collected in this deluxe photo book, California Deathrock.

It reads without words like a yearbook of the era. Looking through the photos brings “ooohs” and “aaahhs” of recognition; the friends, acquaintances, strangers, lovers, and adversaries (if only for their makeup flair or record collections!). Fishing names and memories out of a golden era is just one of the perks of this book. The first of all being the gamut of styles, the theatrics, the glamour, the variety and poetry of appearance that this book represents, a jewel in the collection of anyone who finds beauty in the creativity and expression of the gothic style.
http://californiadeathrock.com for more info:

  
and

http://ameliag.com/cadramzn.php to order!

  

wo

No More Heroes – Rowland S. Howard

Rowland S. Howard, No More Heroes Silkscreen Print TShirt by Mark Splatter, 2014. Memorial Tees for Luminary 20th Century Artists and iconsRowland S. Howard († Dec. 30, 2009) is the fourth print in the No More Heroes series of T-shirts. Howard was the Australian guitarist from The Birthday Party, These Immortal Souls and solo artist in his own right. His luminescent guitar and lyrics left a profound effect on my travels across europe and America, burning their slogans into my heart and leading to ever more artists, F. Céline for instance. His mark was felt across the world and this is made for those who felt the music he created as distinctly as I did.
The print is a halftone treated photograph, all-over print with a heavy hand (thick at the seams for opacity). Printed in white plastisol on black Ultraclub ‘Canvas’ 100% cotton in sizes S – 2XL. Printed to order out of Brooklyn, USA.

No More Heroes – Rowland S. Howard on MarkSplatterPrintwerks Etsy

Damage Patch

Damage Patch Deluxe, Unique Textile Design, Fabric Collage by Mark Splatter. Upcycled, Recycled, Screen Printed and Hand Sewn DesignDamage Patches are decorative elements for streetwear apparel, but also attractive framable wallpieces. They developed out of the band logo and graphic patches that are the basis in the punk, deathrock and heavy metal scene jackets and clothing accesories. Damage Patches are purely decorative curios with no affiliation to bands or brands. Using anatomical, dadaistic and sometimes iconographic elements (Alfred Hitchcock, Dennis Hopper, Jeffrey Lee Pierce etc.) they offer a buffer between such strong statement pieces, or alone, as purely graphic elements.

The Damage Patch is rough-cut and offers a degree of imperfection or blemish to an other undesirably perfect garment like a jacket or totebag. They are textile collages using multiple layers of screenprinted imagery, sewn together. The stitching also incorporates design elements in color and line. Sometimes additional Material is added for texture, such as Constructiuon Netting salvaged from building sites across the world on my travels, from Berlin to Athens, Bucharest, Los Angeles and New York City, to recall a few. Lace, faux fur, and fishnet have also been stitched in to some specimens.

The materials used are nearly all upcycled garments and objects, from thrift store jeans and cast away clothing to destroyed jackets, curtains, and sweaters. My trusty industrial scissors are always at the ready when it comes to preparing fabrics. These were obtained in the Berlin Turkish Market from one of their many vendors in the early 2000s and run nearly the length of my forearm.

Damage Patch Deluxe: Zipper Heart (Gold), Screenprint Textile Collage design by Mark SplatterDamage Patch Deluxe is a further take on the idea and upgrade the Damage Patch with an element of functionality or design complexity unobtainable with simple layers of fabric. Functional Zippers adorn the Zipper Heart line of patches, effectively forming a pocket the size and appearance of an anatomical heart split down the middle by an opening and closing zip.

Hussar

Churchhill_03
Hussar (pron.: /həˈzɑr/ hə-ZAR, /hʊˈzɑr/, or spelling pronunciation /həˈsɑr/ hə-SAR) refers to a number of types of light cavalry which originated in Hungary during the 15th century. The title and distinctive dress of these horsemen was subsequently widely adopted by light cavalry regiments in European and other armies. A number of armored or ceremonial mounted units in modern armies retain the designation of hussars. A shako is a tall, cylindrical military cap, usually with a visor, and sometimes tapered at the top. It is usually adorned with some kind of ornamental plate or badge on the front, metallic or otherwise, and often has a feather, plume (see hackle), or pompon attached at the top. The word shako originated from the Hungarian name csákós süveg (“peaked cap”), which was a part of the uniform of the Hungarian hussar of the 18th century. A pelisse was originally a short fur lined or fur trimmed jacket that was usually worn hanging loose over the left shoulder of hussar light cavalry soldiers, ostensibly to prevent sword cuts. It was fastened there using a lanyard. In cold weather it was worn over a stable jacket or shell jacket, but at all other times it was worn loose over the left shoulder over a jacket of similar style – but without the fur lining or trim – called a dolman jacket. The appearance of the pelise jacket was characteristically very short, extremely tight fitting (when worn), with patterns sewn with bullion lace on the back, cuffs, and collar. The front distinctively featured several rows of parallel frogging and loops, and either three or 5 lines of buttons.

Kiss Your Trash


A few months ago I created a new Tumblr account just to post my favorite pictures from the other tumblrs I began discovering (all hail the *fuckyeah* tag!) when I got my first internet capable phone. I’m posting as much of my graphic/image library thats been accruing since 1999 up to it.

http://kissyourtrash.tumblr.com/

I have two other tumblrs, one for my own portfolio works, and the other dedicated to deathrock and deathrock.com.